Overview

As well as farming at home in the UK, we’re actively involved in growing exotic fruit and premium vegetables from Peru, Kenya, The Gambia, Spain, Brazil, Senegal and many other countries around the world.

With long established relationships, we’re good at what we do, and continually get better by investing in our production technologies, our supply chain, our people and our communities. All of this allows us to ensure our customers receive the very best in sustainable, fresh, high quality produce that’s delivered on time, every time. Having an impressive history in commercialising export horticulture in many developing countries, we stand today as an acknowledged expert and category leader.



Corporate social responsibility

At Wealmoor, CSR lies at the heart of everything we do. We care about all of our farming communities and use our knowledge and expertise to help form collaborative and rewarding relationships. In fact, we have always recognised the vital role agriculture can play as a catalyst for change in rural areas.

This is most ably demonstrated, but not limited to, countries such as Peru, Brazil, The Gambia and Kenya where our farming activities form such an integral part of the fabric of local communities. The projects are often extensive. We’ve supported the funding and building of maternity clinics in rural areas, the investment, construction, resourcing of nursery, primary and secondary schools, the sustainable development and empowerment of women’s grower groups, the provision of staple food stuffs during key religious festivals, continuous free supply of second hand and new clothing, shoes and toys as well as providing relief support to natural disaster areas and victims. Our growers and partnerships are carefully selected to ensure we work closely with and contribute to the communities which we are all involved in. Similarly, our contribution to the development of small grower communities worldwide is something we are immensely proud of and has allowed us to mobilise large swathes of rural communities in the developing world.

What all CSR activities have in common is that like the proverbial “good neighbour” we are able to work hand in hand with communities to identify not just what financial support may be required but also the operational and administrative needs that underpin the sustainability and success of many projects over the longer term.

Our CSR activities are something we are genuinely committed to and extremely proud of. It is an area where we enjoy a long term aspiration to be truly the best in class.


Exotic

Tropical

Chillies

Premium vegetables

Exotic
Sweet potatoes

The sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the bindweed or morning glory family, Convolvulaceae. Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable. The young leaves and shoots are sometimes eaten as greens. The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) and does not belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales.

The plant is a herbaceous perennial vine, bearing alternate heart-shaped or palmately lobed leaves and medium-sized sympetalous flowers. The edible tuberous root is long and tapered, with a smooth skin whose colour ranges between yellow, orange, red, brown, purple, and beige. Its flesh ranges from beige through white, red, pink, violet, yellow, orange, and purple. Sweet potato cultivars with white or pale-yellow flesh are less sweet and moist than those with red, pink or orange flesh.

Exotic
Mango

Mangoes are juicy stone fruit (drupe) from numerous species of tropical trees belonging to the flowering plant genus Mangifera, cultivated mostly for their edible fruit. 

Mangoes are generally sweet, although the taste and texture of the flesh varies across cultivars; some have a soft, pulpy texture similar to an overripe plum, while others are firmer, like a cantaloupe or avocado, and some may have a fibrous texture.

Exotic
Red and green chillies

The Fresno Chili pepper is a medium-sized cultivar of Capsicum annuum. Fresno Chili peppers are frequently used for ceviche, salsa and as an accompaniment for rice and black beans. Because of their thin walls, they do not dry well and are not good for chili powder.

The serrano pepper is a type of chili pepper that originated in the mountainous regions of the Mexican states of Puebla and Hidalgo. The name of the pepper is a reference to the mountains (sierras) of these regions.

Exotic
Fine beans

Green beans are the unripe, young fruit and protective pods of various cultivars of the common bean. Green beans are known by many common names, including French beans, string beans, snap beans, and snaps.

They are distinguished from the many differing varieties of beans in that green beans are harvested and consumed with their enclosing pods, typically before the seeds inside have fully matured. This practice is analogous to the harvesting of unripened pea pods as snow peas or sugar snap peas.

Exotic
Flat leaf parsley

Parsley or garden parsley is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae and widely cultivated as an herb, spice or vegetable. 

Two main groups of parsley used as herbs are curly leaf and flat leaf. Flat-leaved parsley is preferred by some gardeners as it is easier to cultivate, being more tolerant of both rain and sunshine and is said to have a stronger flavour. Green parsley is used frequently as a garnish on potato dishes, rice dishes, or with fish, chicken, lamb, goose and steaks.

Exotic
Sweet potatoes

The sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is a dicotyledonous plant that belongs to the bindweed or morning glory family, Convolvulaceae. Its large, starchy, sweet-tasting, tuberous roots are a root vegetable. The young leaves and shoots are sometimes eaten as greens. The sweet potato is only distantly related to the potato (Solanum tuberosum) and does not belong to the nightshade family, Solanaceae, but both families belong to the same taxonomic order, the Solanales.


The plant is a herbaceous perennial vine, bearing alternate heart-shaped or palmately lobed leaves and medium-sized sympetalous flowers. The edible tuberous root is long and tapered, with a smooth skin whose colour ranges between yellow, orange, red, brown, purple, and beige. Its flesh ranges from beige through white, red, pink, violet, yellow, orange, and purple. Sweet potato cultivars with white or pale-yellow flesh are less sweet and moist than those with red, pink or orange flesh.

Exotic
Butternut squash

Butternut squash (Cucurbita moschata), sometimes known in Australia and New Zealand as butternut pumpkin or gramma, is a type of winter squash that grows on a vine. It has a sweet, nutty taste similar to that of a pumpkin. It has tan-yellow skin and orange fleshy pulp with a compartment of seeds in the bottom. When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer. It is a good source of fibre, vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium; and it is an excellent source of vitamin A.


Although technically a fruit, butternut squash is used as a vegetable that can be roasted, sautéed, toasted, puréed for soups such as squash soup, or mashed to be used in casseroles, breads, muffins, and pies.

Exotic
Yams

Yam is the common name for some plant species in the genus Dioscorea (family Dioscoreaceae) that form edible tubers. Yams are perennial herbaceous vines cultivated for the consumption of their starchy tubers in many temperate and subtropical world regions. The tubers themselves are also called ‘yams’, having numerous cultivars and related species. 


Among the Akan of Ghana, boiled yam can be mashed with palm oil into eto in a similar manner to the plantain dish matoke, and is served with eggs. The boiled yam can also be pounded with a traditional mortar and pestle to create a thick, starchy paste known as iyan (pounded yam) or fufu which is eaten with traditional sauces such as egusi and palm nut soup.

Exotic
Chayote

Chayote (Sechium edule) is an edible plant belonging to the gourd family Cucurbitaceae, along with melons, cucumbers and squash. The chayote fruit is used in mostly cooked forms. When cooked, chayote is usually handled like summer squash, it is generally lightly cooked to retain the crispy consistency. Though rare and often regarded as especially unpalatable and tough in texture, raw chayote may be added to salads or salsas, most often marinated with lemon or lime juice. Whether raw or cooked, chayote is a good source of vitamin C.


Although most people are familiar only with the fruit as being edible, the root, stem, seeds and leaves are edible as well. The tubers of the plant are eaten like potatoes and other root vegetables, while the shoots and leaves are often consumed in salads and stir fries, especially in Asia.


Exotic
Eddoes

Eddoe or eddo is a tropical vegetable often considered identifiable as the species Colocasia antiquorum, closely related to taro which is primarily used for its thickened stems. They grow best in rich loam soil with good drainage, but they can be grown in poorer soil, in drier climates, and in cooler temperatures than taro.

The eddoe is a starchy root that resembles a hairy potato. The flesh is rich in starch and has a nutty flavour. The eddoe is not suitable for consumption raw. It should be cooked properly (fried, steamed or deep fried) before being eaten.

Exotic
Cassava

Cassava (manihot esculenta) is a woody shrub native to South America of the spurge family. It is an edible, tuberous root with a rough, dark brown skin. The flesh is white to yellowish in colour and tastes sweet. Cassava is high in starch. Cassava roots cannot be eaten raw but should be cooked properly before consuming by boiling or frying, for example. Cassava is often prepared and fried in the form of crisps, slices or crackers. 

Cassava is the third-largest source of food carbohydrates in the tropics, after rice and maize. Cassava is a major staple food in the developing world, providing a basic diet for over half a billion people. It is one of the most drought-tolerant crops, capable of growing on marginal soils.

Exotic
Plantain

The term ‘plantain’ is loosely applied to any banana cultivar that is eaten when cooked. Plantains are larger and wider than ordinary bananas. They have a hard peel that can be green, yellow or black depending on the stage of ripeness. Contrary to ordinary bananas, the plantain is mainly fried or cooked before it is eaten. It has a less sweet flavour. Plantains are an important part of meals in various Latin American countries.


Plantains are a staple food in the tropical regions of the world, ranking as the tenth most important staple food in the world. As a staple, plantains are treated in much the same way as potatoes and with a similar neutral flavour and texture when the unripe fruit is cooked by steaming, boiling or frying. Since they fruit all year round, plantains are a reliable all-season staple food, particularly in developing countries with inadequate food storage, preservation and transportation technologies.

Exotic
Dudhi

The dudhi is a course vine reaching lengths of several meters, which can be either harvested young to be consumed as a vegetable, or harvested mature to be dried and used as a utensil. When it is fresh, the fruit has a light green smooth skin and white flesh. The leaves are rounded, 10cm – 40cm wide and slightly hairy on both sides. The dudhi is used in cooking as per other squashes and makes a perfect alternative to the courgette. The fruit is a good source of iron, calcium, phosphorus and vitamin B.

Tropical
Mango

Mangoes are juicy stone fruit (drupe) from numerous species of tropical trees belonging to the flowering plant genus Mangifera, cultivated mostly for their edible fruit. Mangoes are generally sweet, although the taste and texture of the flesh varies across cultivars; some have a soft, pulpy texture similar to an overripe plum, while others are firmer, like a cantaloupe or avocado, and some may have a fibrous texture.

Tropical
Papaya

The papaya is a small, sparsely branched tree, usually with a single stem growing from 5 – 10 m (16 – 33ft) tall, with spirally arranged leaves confined to the top of the trunk. The fruit is a large berry about 15 – 45cm (5.9 – 17.7in) long and 10 – 30cm (3.9 – 11.8in) in diameter. It is ripe when it feels soft (as soft as a ripe avocado or a bit softer) and its skin has attained an amber to orange hue.

The ripe fruit of the papaya is usually eaten raw, without skin or seeds. The unripe green fruit can be eaten cooked, usually in curries, salads, and stews. Green papaya is used in Southeast Asian cooking, both raw and cooked.In Thai cuisine, papaya is used to make Thai salads such as som tam and Thai curries such as kaeng som when still not fully ripe. In Indonesian cuisine, the unripe green fruits and young leaves are boiled for use as part of lalab salad, while the flower buds are sautéed and stir-fried with chillies and green tomatoes as Minahasan papaya flower vegetable dish. Papayas have a relatively high amount of pectin, which can be used to make jellies.

Tropical
Figs

Ficus carica is an Asian species of flowering plant in the mulberry family, known as the common fig (or just the fig). It is the source of the fruit also called the fig and as such is an important crop in those areas where it is grown commercially. Native to the Middle East and western Asia, it has been sought out and cultivated since ancient times and is now widely grown throughout the world, both for its fruit and as an ornamental plant.

Figs can be eaten fresh or dried, and used in jam-making. Most commercial production is in dried or otherwise processed forms, since the ripe fruit does not transport well, and once picked does not keep well. The widely produced fig newton or fig roll is a biscuit with a filling made from figs. Fresh figs used in cooking should be plump and soft, and without bruising or splits.

Tropical
Pommegranate

The pomegranate (Punica granatum) is a fruit-bearing deciduous shrub or small tree in the family Lythraceae that grows between 5 – 10m (16 – 33ft) tall. As intact arils or juice, pomegranates are used in baking, cooking, juice blends, meal garnishes, smoothies, and alcoholic beverages, such as cocktails and wine. 

Red-purple in colour, the pomegranate fruit husk has two parts: an outer, hard pericarp, and an inner, spongyesocarp (white ‘albedo’), which comprises the fruit inner wall where arils attach. Membranes of the mesocarp are organized as non-symmetrical chambers that contain seeds inside arils, which are embedded without attachment to the mesocarp. Containing juice, the arils are formed as a thin membrane derived from the epidermal cells of the seeds. The number of seeds in a pomegranate can vary from 200 to about 1,400.

Tropical
Passion fruit

The passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) is a vine species of passion flower. It is cultivated commercially in tropical and subtropical areas for its sweet, seedy fruit. The passion fruit is a pepo, a type of berry, round to oval, either yellow or dark purple at maturity, with a soft to firm, juicy interior filled with numerous seeds. The fruit is both eaten and juiced; passion fruit juice is often added to other fruit juices to enhance aroma. 

The berry produced is fleshy and spherical. It is 1 – 1.4cm long and 9 – 13mm thick with a thick layer of pith. The outside colour of the berry ranges from hues of dark-purple to black with fine white specks light yellow in colour. Within the berry, there are typically 250 black seeds, each 2.4mm in length. Each seed is surrounded by a membranous sac filled with pulpy juice. The flavour of the juice is slightly acidic and musky. The passion fruit's flavour can be compared to that of the guava fruit.

Tropical
Sharon fruit / persimmon

Sharon fruit, named after the Sharon plain in Israel, is the marketing name for the Israeli-bred cultivar 'Triumph'. The sharon fruit has no core, is seedless and particularly sweet, and can be eaten whole. They are eaten fresh, dried, raw, or cooked. When eaten fresh, they are usually eaten whole like an apple in bite-size slices and may be peeled. One way to consume ripe Sharon fruit, which may have soft texture, is to remove the top leaf with a paring knife and scoop out the flesh with a spoon. Riper Sharon fruit can also be eaten by removing the top leaf, breaking the fruit in half, and eating from the inside out. The flesh ranges from firm to mushy, and, when firm owing to being unripe, has an apple-like crunch.

Tropical
Lychee

The lychee is the sole member of the genus Litchi in the soapberry family, Sapindaceae. It is a tropical tree native to the Guangdong and Fujian provinces of China, where cultivation is documented from 1059 AD. China is the main producer of lychees, followed by India, other countries in Southeast Asia, the Indian Subcontinent and South Africa.

A tall evergreen tree, the lychee bears small fleshy fruits. The outside of the fruit is pink-red, roughly textured and inedible, covering sweet flesh eaten in many different dessert dishes. Since the perfume-like flavour is lost in the process of canning, the fruit is usually eaten fresh.

Tropical
Limes

A lime is a hybrid citrus fruit, which is typically round, lime green, 3 – 6cm (1.2 – 2.4in) in diameter, and contains acidic juice vesicles. There are several species of citrus trees whose fruits are called limes, including the Key lime (Citrus aurantifolia), Persian lime, kaffir lime, and desert lime. Limes are a rich source of vitamin C, sour and are often used to accent the flavours of foods and beverages. They are grown year-round.

In cooking, lime is valued both for the acidity of its juice and the floral aroma of its zest. It is a common ingredient in authentic Mexican, Vietnamese and Thai dishes. Lime soup is a traditional dish from the Mexican state of Yucatan. It is also used for its pickling properties in ceviche. Some guacamole recipes call for lime juice.

Tropical
Physalis

The physalis is a genus of flowering plants in the nightshade family. A notable feature is the formation of a large papery husk derived from the calyx, which partly or fully encloses the fruit. The fruit is small and orange, similar in size, shape and structure to a small tomato.

Not all Physalis species bear edible fruit. Select species are cultivated for their edible fruit, however; the typical Physalis fruit is similar to a firm tomato in texture, and like strawberries or pineapple in flavor, with a mild acidity. Some species, such as the Cape gooseberry and tomatillo have been bred into many cultivars with varying flavours, from tart to sweet to savoury.

Tropical
Dragon fruit

The ‘pitaya’ or ‘pitahaya’ is the fruit of several cactus species. The pitaya usually refers to fruit of the genus ‘Stenocereus’ while pitahaya or dragon fruit refers to fruit of the genus ‘Hylocereus’. The most commonly seen dragon fruit has pink-skinned fruit with white flesh. The fruit's texture is sometimes likened to that of the kiwifruit because of its black, crunchy seeds. The flesh is mildly sweet and low in calories. The seeds have a nutty taste and are rich in lipids.

Tropical
Pomelo

The pomelo is a natural citrus fruit, similar in appearance to a large grapefruit, native to South and Southeast Asia. Typically, the fruit is pale green to yellow when ripe, with sweet white flesh and a very thick albedo. It is a large citrus fruit, 15 – 25cm in diameter, usually weighing 1 to 2kg. The fruit tastes like a sweet, mild grapefruit, although the typical pomelo is much larger than the grapefruit, and also has a much thicker rind. Sometimes, the peel is used to make marmalade, may be candied, or dipped in chocolate. In Brazil, the thick skin is often used for making a sweet conserve, while the spongy pith of the rind is discarded. In Sri Lanka, it is often eaten as a dessert, either raw or sprinkled with sugar.

Tropical
Coconut

The term coconut can refer to the whole coconut palm or the seed, or the fruit, which, botanically, is a drupe, not a nut. Coconuts are known for their versatility ranging from food to cosmetics. They form a regular part of the diets of many people in the tropics and subtropics. The various parts of the coconut have a number of culinary uses. The seed provides oil for frying, cooking, and making margarine. The white, fleshy part of the seed, the coconut meat, is used fresh or dried in cooking, especially in confections and desserts such as macaroons. Desiccated coconut or coconut milk made from it is frequently added to curries and other savoury dishes.

Tropical
Asian pear

Pyrus pyrifolia is a species of pear tree native to East Asia. The tree›s edible fruit is known by many names, including: Asian pear, Chinese pear, Korean pear, Japanese pear, Taiwanese pear, and sand pear. Asian pears vary in colour from golden yellow to rusted green and are often times speckled with small brown spots. Asian pears can vary in shape and size including some varieties which have a round squat shape similar to that of an apple. Prized for their crunchy texture the creamy white flesh of the Asian pear is exceptionally juicy with a sweet low acid flavour and fragrant aroma.

Tropical
Rambutan

The rambutan is a medium-sized tropical tree in the family Sapindaceae. The name also refers to the edible fruit produced by this tree. The rambutan is native to the Malay-Indonesian region, and other regions of tropical Southeast Asia. It is closely related to several other edible tropical fruits including the lychee, longan, and mamoncillo. The name ‘rambutan’ is derived from the Malay-Indonesian languages word for rambut or ‘hair’, a reference to the numerous hairy protuberances of the fruit.

Tropical
Mangosteen

The purple mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana), known simply as mangosteen, is a tropical evergreen tree believed to have originated in the Sunda Islands of the Malay archipelago and the Moluccas of Indonesia. The fruit of the mangosteen is sweet and tangy, juicy, somewhat fibrous, with fluid-filled vesicles (like the flesh of citrus fruits), with an inedible, deep reddish-purple coloured rind when ripe. In each fruit, the seeds are almond-shaped and sized.

Tropical
Guavas

Guavas are common tropical fruits cultivated and enjoyed in many tropical and subtropical regions. Guava fruits, usually 4 – 12cm (1.6 – 4.7in) long, are round or oval depending on the species. They have a pronounced and typical fragrance, similar to lemon rind but less sharp. The outer skin may be rough, often with a bitter taste, or soft and sweet. In many countries, guava is eaten raw, typically cut into quarters or eaten like an apple, whereas in other countries it is eaten with a pinch of salt and pepper or a mix of spices.

Chillies
Red & green chillies

The Fresno Chili pepper is a medium-sized cultivar of Capsicum annuum. Fresno Chili peppers are frequently used for ceviche, salsa and as an accompaniment for rice and black beans. Because of their thin walls, they do not dry well and are not good for chili powder. The serrano pepper is a type of chili pepper that originated in the mountainous regions of the Mexican states of Puebla and Hidalgo. The name of the pepper is a reference to the mountains (sierras) of these regions.

Chillies
Thin chillies

Bird's eye chili, piri piri or Thai chili is a chili pepper, a cultivar from the species Capsicum annuum, commonly found in Ethiopia and Southeast Asia. In Vietnamese cuisine, these chilis are used in soups, salads, and stir-fried dishes. They are also put in a wide variety of sauces, sambals, and marinades, used as a condiment or eaten raw, both fresh and dried.

In Thai cuisine, these chilis are highly valued for their fruity taste and extreme spiciness. They are extensively used in many Thai dishes, such as in Thai curries and in Thai salads, green as well as the ripe red chilis; or they can just be eaten raw on the side, with for instance, khao kha mu (stewed pork trotter served with rice).

Chillies
Naga

The Naga Viper pepper is a hot chili pepper. In 2011, it was recorded as the ‘World's Hottest Chili’ by the Guinness World Records with a rating of 1,382,118 Scoville Heat Units (SHU), but was surpassed in SHU by several other peppers, such as Pepper X in 2017. The Naga Viper was created in England by chilli farmer Gerald Fowler of The Chilli Pepper Company in Cark, Cumbria. It is claimed to be an unstable three-way hybrid produced from the Naga Morich, the Bhut jolokia and the Trinidad scorpion, some of the world's hottest peppers.

Chillies
Habaneros / scotch bonnet

The habanero is a variety of chili pepper. Unripe habaneros are green, and they colour as they mature. The most common colour variants are orange and red, but the fruit may also be white, brown, yellow, green, or purple. Typically, a ripe habanero chili is 2 – 6cm (0.8 – 2.4in) long. Habanero chilis are very hot, rated 100,000 – 350,000 on the Scoville scale. The habanero's heat, its flavour, and its floral aroma have made it a popular ingredient in hot sauces and spicy foods.

The scotch bonnet is named for its resemblance to a tam o’ shanter hat. Most scotch bonnets have a heat rating of 80,000 – 400,000 Scoville units. These peppers are used to flavour many different dishes and cuisines worldwide and are often used in hot sauces and condiments.

Premium vegetables
Fine beans

Green beans are the unripe, young fruit and protective pods of various cultivars of the common bean. Green beans are known by many common names, including French beans, string beans, snap beans, and snaps. They are distinguished from the many differing varieties of beans in that green beans are harvested and consumed with their enclosing pods, typically before the seeds inside have fully matured. This practice is analogous to the harvesting of unripened pea pods as snow peas or sugar snap peas.

Premium vegetables
Extra fine beans

Green beans are the unripe, young fruit and protective pods of various cultivars of the common bean. Green beans are known by many common names, including French beans, string beans, snap beans, and snaps. They are distinguished from the many differing varieties of beans in that green beans are harvested and consumed with their enclosing pods, typically before the seeds inside have fully matured. This practice is analogous to the harvesting of unripened pea pods as snow peas or sugar snap peas.

Premium vegetables
Mangetout

The name mangetout can apply to both snow peas and to snap peas. Snow peas, along with sugar snap peas and unlike field and garden peas, are notable for having edible pods that lack inedible fibre in the pod walls. Snow peas have the thinner walls of the two edible pod variants. The stems and leaves of the immature plant are used as a vegetable in Chinese cooking, stir-fried with garlic and sometimes combined with crab or other shellfish.

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Sugar snaps

The snap pea, also known as the sugar snap pea, is a cultivar group of edible-podded peas. The snap pea differs from the snow pea in that their pods are rounded as opposed to flat and thicker. Snap peas, like all other peas, are pod fruits. An edible-podded pea is similar to a garden, or English, pea, but the pod is less fibrous, and edible when young. Pods of the edible-podded pea, including snap peas, do not have a membrane and do not open when ripe. At maturity, the pods grow to around 4 – 8cm in length, Pods contain three to eight peas per pod.

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Dwarf beans

Dwarf French Beans are easy to grow and give superb yields for a small amount of effort. Like their climbing cousins, Dwarf French Beans are also self fertile, making them ideal for growing under cover early or late in the season.

To enjoy at their best, pick when young and tender and cook the pods whole. If pods are left to mature on the plant they can be dried and shelled as haricot beans for winter use.

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Runner beans

Phaseolus coccineus, known as runner bean is a plant in the legume or Fabaceae family. Most varieties have red flowers and multicoloured seeds, and they are often grown as ornamental plants. The vine can grow to 3m (9ft) or more in length. The knife-shaped pods are normally green; however, there are very rare varieties bred by amateurs that have very unusual purple pods. An example of such a purple-podded runner bean is 'Aeron Purple Star'.

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Helda beans

Flat beans, also known as helda beans, in some Indian states is a vegetable and a type of bean with a wide, flat edible pod. Flat beans are normally cooked and served in their pods, as green beans. Like many other types of bean they can also be dehusked or shelled and the small white kernels dried and stored, but there is no incentive to grow them for this purpose as higher-yielding bean varieties are available.

Modern flat bean varieties picked while young are stringless. Older varieties or beans allowed to ripen on the vine may contain strings.

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Baby corn

Baby corn (also known as young corn or baby sweetcorn) is a cereal grain taken from corn (maize) harvested early while the stalks are still small and immature. It typically is eaten whole, cob included – in contrast to mature corn, whose cob is too tough for human consumption. It is eaten both raw and cooked. Baby corn is common in stir fry dishes.

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Baby courgette

The courgette is a summer squash which can reach nearly a metre in length but is usually harvested early. Along with certain other squashes and pumpkins, it belongs to the species Cucurbita pepo. Unlike cucumber, the courgette is usually served cooked. It can be prepared using a variety of cooking techniques, including steamed, boiled, grilled, stuffed and baked, barbecued, fried, or incorporated in other recipes such as soufflés.

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Baby carrots

A baby carrot is a carrot sold at a smaller size before reaching maturity. The carrot is a root vegetable, usually orange in colour, though purple, black, red, white, and yellow cultivars exist. The carrot is a biennial plant in the umbellifer family Apiaceae. At first, it grows a rosette of leaves while building up the enlarged taproot. Fast-growing cultivars mature within three months (90 days) of sowing the seed, while slowermaturing cultivars are harvested four months later (120 days). The roots contain high quantities of alpha- and beta-carotene, and are a good source of vitamin K and vitamin B6.

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Asparagus

Asparagus is a spring vegetable, a flowering perennial plant species in the genus Asparagus. It can grow to 100 – 150cm (39 – 59in) tall, with stout stems with much-branched, feathery foliage. Only young asparagus shoots are commonly eaten: once the buds start to open (ferning out), the shoots quickly turn woody. Water makes up 93% of asparagus's composition.

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Tender stem broccoli

Broccoli is an edible green plant in the cabbage family whose large flowering head is eaten as a vegetable. There are three commonly grown types of broccoli. The most familiar is Calabrese broccoli, often referred to simply as ‘broccoli’, named after Calabria in Italy. It has large (10 – 20cm) green heads and thick stalks. It is a cool season annual crop. Sprouting broccoli has a larger number of heads with many thin stalks. Purple cauliflower is a type of broccoli grown in Europe and North America. It has a head shaped like cauliflower, but consisting of tiny flower buds. It sometimes, but not always, has a purple cast to the tips of the flower buds. Tenderstem® broccoli is a hybrid cross bred version combining Chinese kale and broccoli.

Herbs & ingredients

Herbs & ingredients
Flat leaf parsley

Parsley or garden parsley is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae and widely cultivated as an herb, spice or vegetable. Two main groups of parsley used as herbs are curly leaf and flat leaf. Flat-leaved parsley is preferred by some gardeners as it is easier to cultivate, being more tolerant of both rain and sunshine and is said to have a stronger flavour. Green parsley is used frequently as a garnish on potato dishes, rice dishes, or with fish, chicken, lamb, goose and steaks.

Herbs & ingredients
Corriander

Coriander, also known as cilantro or Chinese parsley, is an annual herb in the family Apiaceae. All parts of the plant are edible, but the fresh leaves and the dried seeds are the parts most traditionally used in cooking. It is a soft plant growing to 50cm (20in) tall. The leaves are variable in shape, broadly lobed at the base of the plant, and slender and feathery higher on the flowering stems. The flowers are borne in small umbels, white or very pale pink, asymmetrical, with the petals pointing away from the centre of the umbel longer than those pointing toward it.

Herbs & ingredients
Dill

Dill (Anethum graveolens) is an annual herb in the celery family Apiaceae. It is the only species in the genus Anethum. Dill is widely grown in Eurasia where its leaves and seeds are used as an herb or spice for flavouring food. Fresh and dried dill leaves are widely used as herbs in Europe and central Asia. Like caraway, the fernlike leaves of dill are aromatic and are used to flavour many foods such as gravlax (cured salmon) and other fish dishes, borscht and other soups, as well as pickles (where the dill flower is sometimes used). Dill is best when used fresh as it loses its flavour rapidly if dried; however, freeze-dried dill leaves retain their flavour relatively well for a few months.

Herbs & ingredients
Mint

Mentha, also known as mint, is a genus of plants in the family Lamiaceae. It is estimated that 13 to 18 species exist. Mints are aromatic, almost exclusively perennial, rarely annual herbs. They have wide-spreading underground and overground stolons and erect, square, branched stems. The leaves are arranged in opposite pairs, from oblong to lanceolate, often downy, and with a serrated margin. Leaf colours range from dark green and grey-green to purple, blue, and sometimes pale yellow. The flowers are white to purple and produced in false whorls called verticillasters. The corolla is two-lipped with four subequal lobes, the upper lobe usually the largest. The fruit is a nutlet, containing one to four seeds.

Herbs & ingredients
Spinach

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is an edible flowering plant in the family Amaranthaceae native to central and western Asia. Its leaves are eaten as a vegetable. It is an annual plant growing as tall as 30cm. The leaves are alternate, simple, ovate to triangular, and very variable in size. The flowers are inconspicuous, yellow-green, maturing into a small, hard, dry, lumpy fruit cluster containing several seeds.

Herbs & ingredients
Basil

Basil is native to tropical regions from central Africa to Southeast Asia. Basil is sensitive to cold, with best growth in hot, dry conditions. It is a tender plant, and is used in cuisines worldwide. Basil is most commonly used fresh in recipes. In general, it is added at the last moment, as cooking quickly destroys the flavour. 

Herbs & ingredients
Oregano

Oregano is a flowering plant in the mint family. It is native to temperate Western and Southwestern Eurasia and the Mediterranean region. Oregano is related to the herb marjoram, sometimes being referred to as wild marjoram. It is a culinary herb, used for the flavour of its leaves, which can be more flavourful when dried than fresh. Factors such as climate, season, and soil composition may affect the aromatic oils present in Oregano.

Love Me Tender range

Watch out! Details about our Love Me Tender range are coming soon.